Tagged As: grip

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In Focus: Bonnie Blake

Female camera operators are still the exception in film and TV, but that never deterred Bonnie Blake, who’s carved out an impressive career. She’s always in demand, and her credits read like a list of TV’s biggest hits, from Malcolm in the Middle to Monk to CSI: NY.

CBS Corporation

CBS Corporation is one of America’s largest media and entertainment companies, with divisions operating in the areas of film, television, radio, interactive media, and publishing, among others.

Limelight Productions, Inc.

Founded by William Beautyman in 1972, Limelight Productions supplies production equipment and installation services for the entertainment industry.

Silvercup Studios

Silvercup Studios is independently owned and operated by brothers Alan and Stuart Suna, and takes its name from the former bakery on which the first shooting stage now sits.

 

Mole-Richardson Co.

Italian immigrant Peter Mole and his partners, Elmer Richardson and Fielding Coates, founded Mole-Richardson in 1927 to pursue new techniques and technology in production lighting. One year later, the company introduced its first line of incandescent lighting instruments; the “Inkie” quickly became the preferred choice among cinematographers. 

Dolly Grip

The dolly grip is not the designated Barbie wrangler, but a specialist member of the grip department. 

Best Boy Grip

The assistant to the key grip is the best boy, responsible for supervising the department technicians. This moniker applies to both male and female technicians, and is derived from the pre-union days of film when the elevated rank was granted conditionally to the best and brightest on the team.

Key Grip

Best guess is the term “grip” comes from the old English theater, and referred to a tool bag or “bag of tricks.” When someone called for the grip, a technician would fetch the bag. Over time, “get the grip” was a call for the person with the grip, and eventually the term stuck to that technician. In American theater the term is long forgotten, but it has translated into film and television production.

Camera Operator

The camera operator works under the supervision of the director of photography (cinematographer) and is tasked with ensuring that the camera gets each shot just as the DP and director have instructed. Depending on the size and budget of a production, there may be several camera operators working in tandem.

Director of Photography

The camera serves as the audience’s eye into worlds that are strange, dramatic, and fascinating. Through film and television the viewer suspends disbelief to accompany the cast on an adventure—to end in catastrophe or celebration. The director of photography is perhaps most responsible for guiding our eye on the journey the director has designed.