Tagged As: lighting

The Following content has been tagged as "lighting"


Spotlight Operator

Whether picking up Slash for a wicked guitar solo or following Kristin Chenoweth as she belts a glory note, the spotlight operator’s primary responsibility is to highlight the focal person or persons on stage. A followspot serves to direct the audience’s attention and fill in the gaps of the stage lighting.

Director

Like a film director, the stage director supervises both the performance and technical aspects of a production. He or she has the artistic spirit of a designer, the methodical mind of a technician, and a poetic soul.

Technical Director

A live production’s technical staff can number dozens or hundreds; to ensure that the lighting designer is not calling focus the same day the deck is being painted, a technical director is in place to coordinate between departments. This person is an artist, a craftsperson, and technician; without a technical director, the production process is more chaos theory than the realization of organic creation.

Key Grip

Best guess is the term “grip” comes from the old English theater, and referred to a tool bag or “bag of tricks.” When someone called for the grip, a technician would fetch the bag. Over time, “get the grip” was a call for the person with the grip, and eventually the term stuck to that technician. In American theater the term is long forgotten, but it has translated into film and television production.

Gaffer

Lighting is one of the most important components to setting up the perfect shot. Proper lighting completes the scene by adding a dark and gloomy hue to an ominous rainy night, or sundrenched haze on a deserted island. Directors cannot rely on natural lighting to accomplish their vision; instead they create their own effects with the help of the gaffer.

Production Designer

The production designer collaborates with the director and the cinematographer to establish the look of a film or television production. Every story is intended to leave the audience with a particular emotion, and the design of the set and scenery is just as vital in that mission as an actor’s portrayal of a character and the music that plays under the images on screen. 

Director of Photography

The camera serves as the audience’s eye into worlds that are strange, dramatic, and fascinating. Through film and television the viewer suspends disbelief to accompany the cast on an adventure—to end in catastrophe or celebration. The director of photography is perhaps most responsible for guiding our eye on the journey the director has designed.

Best Boy Electric

Sometimes credited as the assistant chief lighting technician, the best boy (so called whether male or female) of the electric (lighting) department is the second in command under the gaffer. This role is not to be confused with the best boy grip, under the key grip.