Tagged As: paint foreman

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Paint Coordinator

The paint coordinator on a film or television show is hired by the production designer or art director and is responsible for the supervision and organization of the paint department, as well as the execution of all paint assignments, including painting sets, props, backdrops, signs, and permanent buildings or soundstages.

Lead Painter

Hired during pre-production by the paint coordinator or paint foreman on a film or television set, the lead painter is a senior member of the crew who shall take on the greatest responsibility for mentoring the staff at large and for setting the example for artistic quality.

Scenic Carpenter

Green screen sound stages and virtual scenery are becoming more prevalent in film and television production, but most productions—save for maybe some reality programs—still require the labor and skill of trained craftspeople to build the sets that complete the environment that the characters inhabit.

Construction Buyer

Hired during pre-production of a film, television show, or live production, the construction buyer works under the direction of the construction coordinator and construction foreman to source all materials necessary to complete the build of set pieces and scenery.

Paint Foreman

The paint foreman may be hired by the paint coordinator and begins work during pre-production on a film or television program. This person is second in command of the paint department and must be capable of assuming the role of the crew head in the event that the paint coordinator is unavailable.

Painter

Scenery grounds a story in a particular time and place and is one of the visual elements that most absorbs an audience into the scene with the cast on screen. Carpenters are responsible for building those sets, but the sets are never complete until the crew of painters has taken their brushes to them.

Key Scenic Artist

In film and television production, it is often cumbersome and costly to use authentic materials in set construction. Instead, wood paneling, marble countertops, or titanium alloy bulkheads are replicated and approximated with cheaper stand-ins. With help from the carpenters, scenic artists complete this illusion with the application of faux finishes and expert painting techniques. As highly specialized artists, these members of the paint department focus on disguising one material for another and tricking the camera’s lens.