Tagged As: scenic carpenter

The Following content has been tagged as "scenic carpenter"


Paint Coordinator

The paint coordinator on a film or television show is hired by the production designer or art director and is responsible for the supervision and organization of the paint department, as well as the execution of all paint assignments, including painting sets, props, backdrops, signs, and permanent buildings or soundstages.

Special Effects Technician

In live production, special effects can involve any elements consisting of water, fire, haze, pyrotechnics, confetti cannons, and similar atmospheric or mechanical devices. This department works closely with the scenic, automation, and props crews, and may see some overlap between them.

Construction Foreman

Scenery is one of the most comprehensive visual elements of a film or television production. Sets establish a time and place but can also become characters in themselves, with great craftsmanship and effort put forth to providing an immersive environment in which the cast plays out the story. Just consider for a moment the iconic places audiences have traveled through scenery, like the bridge of the Starship Enterprise or the untamed and ominous ruins of Kurtz’s Cambodian compound. 

Carpenter’s Assistant

This entry-level position in film, television, and live production works within the scenic or construction department and is vital to the efficient operation of the scene shop and to building of sets during pre-production. 

Special Effects Designer

The execution of special effects on stage is a complicated and intricate process; as the audience is live and up-close, directors do not have the luxury of another take, such as in film or television, and there is no polishing in post-production. Instead, all effects must perform correctly the first time and do so repeatedly for each performance. This calls for intense collaboration between design departments, as well as the skill and expertise of a highly trained professional.

Scenic Carpenter

Green screen sound stages and virtual scenery are becoming more prevalent in film and television production, but most productions—save for maybe some reality programs—still require the labor and skill of trained craftspeople to build the sets that complete the environment that the characters inhabit.