Tagged As: sound effects

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Assistant Sound Effects Editor

While watching a film or television show, you may not immediately appreciate the effort of a sound effects editor. By their very nature, sound effects are generally background information that is meant to deliver a more complete sensory experience. However, if you can close your eyes—just listen—and see in your mind just as clearly the action on screen, likely the sound effects provide you with an accurate mental picture.

Assistant Dialogue Editor

On a lucky day, the average film may require only a few minutes of replacement dialogue to substitute for unusable audio recorded during principal photography. Then there are those films that necessitate a great deal of ADR because of added special effects or particularly challenging environmental conditions where ADR editors may be working on replacement tracks in the double-digits. When a single ADR editor winds up with a massive workload, he or she often relies on an assistant to keep the process organized and efficient.

Sound Effects Editor

Without the noises and sounds that accompany all physical action in real life, a movie or television show lacks the reality that our brains expect and need in order to fully become immersed in the viewing experience. The sound effects editor works under the direction of the supervising sound editor and is responsible for manufacturing, recording, and editing all sound effects tracks included in a film or TV show.

Sound Designer

The lineage of the sound designer title can be traced back to Francis Ford Coppola, who granted the title to Walter Murch for his exceptional work in the creation of original sound effects and achievements in sound manipulation for Apocalypse Now. Coppola defined the role of the sound designer as “an individual ultimately responsible for all aspects of a film’s audio track, from the dialogue and sound effects recording to the re-recording (mix) of the final track.”

Audio Lead

Every piece of audio embedded in a game passes through the hands of the audio lead. This person is responsible for compiling and designing sound effects, background score, and other audio assets that create a rich, fully immersive experience for the player.

Production Sound Mixer

Since The Jazz Singer first combined a synchronized instrumental score, spoken dialogue, and sound effects in 1927, audio has been an essential creative component to film and television production. Can you imagine Star Wars or Saving Private Ryan without sound? Behind all of the music, noise, and laughter that enhances the images on screen is the production sound mixer.