Tagged As: supervisor

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Assistant Studio Manager

The assistant studio manager works under the direction of the studio manager to ensure the efficient day-to-day operation of the facility. This person is delegated supervisory responsibility over the general staff, and is charged with overseeing the studio in the manager’s absence.

Supervising Sound Editor

The supervising sound editor is a department head who oversees the entire post-production sound crew, including the music editor, sound editor, Foley artist, and ADR editor.

Recording Studio Manager

The manager of a recording studio may be the owner of the company, partial owner, or an employee hired to manage the staff and day-to-day operations of business. This individual cooperates with all clients renting space and equipment at the studio, including producers, recording artists, and band managers.

Lighting Supervisor

At a resident theatrical company or on a large touring production, there is usually a lighting department supervisor.

Lead Animator

The lead animator at a game development studio is a mentor to the junior staff who guides and tutors the artists in evolving and developing their talent. This person is also the right hand of the animation director in supervising the staff toward completion of animation assets in a timely, efficient manner.

Animation Director

Just as the art director ensures quality and a consistent aesthetic through the delivery of all art assets, the animation director is tasked with overseeing the staff of animators who work in video game development.

Technical Art Director

Bridging the technology gap between game artists and programmers, the technical art director is primarily concerned with the development and implementation of tools to efficiently facilitate the creation of art assets with computer software, and the porting of those assets through the pipeline.

Scenic Charge Artist

It is generally cost-prohibitive to use authentic materials to build theatrical sets, thus productions rely on skilled artists who replicate the real world—bricks, velvet, blue sky—on stage with a paintbrush. The scenic charge artist is essentially a scenic painter who is responsible for interpreting the set designer’s illustrations concerning the color and texture of the scenery’s surfaces.

Game Producer

What a producer does can be a mystery to those outside a project, in any segment of the entertainment industry. Essentially, producers are leaders and facilitators who keep their entire team on the ball. In game development, the producer of a game is responsible for ensuring that the product is delivered on time, on budget, and with as few headaches as possible.

Tools Engineer

Tools, in the game development world, are specialized software applications that are designed to facilitate the work of designers, artists, and programmers. A tools engineer is the individual responsible for creating and maintaining that software for the studio. Game development studios use a number of third-party systems like Maya, Houdini, and the Unreal engine to bring characters and environments to life, but many studios also rely on in-house engineers to develop and maintain proprietary systems that are specifically designed to meet the needs of a particular game.