Tagged As: theater

The Following content has been tagged as "theater"


Company Manager

The company manager is hired by the general manager of a theatrical or live stage production, and is primarily responsible for managing payroll for the cast and crew and numerous other logistical concerns. As the person who signs the paychecks, the company manager is very popular, though not always as well-loved as policy enforcer or bearer of a termination notice.

The Ant Farm

The Ant Farm is an award-winning advertising firm that specializes in print and audio-visual advertising for theatrical, video game, broadcast, and home entertainment markets. In 2010, the firm took home a Key Art award for the theatrical trailer of Where the Wild Things Are and an award at MI6 for the Modern Warfare 2 television campaign.

Casting Assistant

The assistant to the casting director, or firm of multiple casting directors, is responsible for supporting the company’s operations through a number of administrative and secretarial tasks, as well as performing research and preparation for auditions.

Casting Director

The casting director, or more often a casting firm, is hired by the producer of a stage show to audition and recommend actors, singers, and dancers, in cooperation with the director, musical director, and choreographer.

Adirondack Studios

Co-owners David Thomas Lloyd and Christopher Detmer founded Adirondack Studios in 1975 in upstate New York with the core objective of providing custom scenery and technology solutions to the performing arts industry.

Production Manager

“Creatives,” or those who are concerned only with the artistic details of a project, tend to have a difficult time editing their imaginations to fit a budget. That is where the production manager comes in; he or she is the keeper of the cash, the parental figure doling out the allowance. A theatrical production or concert consists of numerous departments and technical elements that compete for a slice of the money pie, but must cooperate to put on a cohesive show.

Dramaturg

Merriam-Webster defines dramaturgy as the art or technique of dramatic composition and theatrical representation, but that gives little indication as to what a dramaturg actually does. In American theater the job description is often very loosely defined, but generally refers to the member of the company in charge of historical research.

Stage Automation Technician

Traditionally, scenery was flown in from above the stage or pushed on from the wings, but now, on automated shows, one individual behind a console can accomplish the work previously done by several fly men and stagehands. This has also been a field dominated by men, but more and more women are expanding into the areas of automation and rigging.

Stage Automation Engineer

To accomplish the fantastic feat of a flying car in that stage version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, or rotating and tilting the 50-ton Sand/Cliff Deck in , theatrical productions rely on sophisticated technology and the skills of a stage automation engineer.

Scenic Charge Artist

It is generally cost-prohibitive to use authentic materials to build theatrical sets, thus productions rely on skilled artists who replicate the real world—bricks, velvet, blue sky—on stage with a paintbrush. The scenic charge artist is essentially a scenic painter who is responsible for interpreting the set designer’s illustrations concerning the color and texture of the scenery’s surfaces.