Tagged As: theatrical design

The Following content has been tagged as "theatrical design"


Leadman

Set dressing is a simple task—place a dish there, a curtain here—that plays an important role in the realism and continuity of a film or television production. A bare set of walls or empty backlot street is not nearly as convincing or enveloping as a fully dressed environment with all of the ordinary items that humans interact with in real life. 

Flyman

Flys, not flies, refer to the permanent weighted batten systems in theatrical venues that are used to raise and lower scenery and electrics on stage. To fly something in or out is to raise or lower an object on deck via this system. Many theaters have made the conversion to automated flys that use motors or chain hoists, but manual structures are still the most prevalently used.

Set Costume Supervisor

It is rare that a costume designer works on location with the production crew during principal photography. More often, the costume designer designates a surrogate that will execute the design on set and provide leadership for the costume department.

Paint Foreman

The paint foreman may be hired by the paint coordinator and begins work during pre-production on a film or television program. This person is second in command of the paint department and must be capable of assuming the role of the crew head in the event that the paint coordinator is unavailable.

Painter

Scenery grounds a story in a particular time and place and is one of the visual elements that most absorbs an audience into the scene with the cast on screen. Carpenters are responsible for building those sets, but the sets are never complete until the crew of painters has taken their brushes to them.