Tagged As: wardrobe

The Following content has been tagged as "wardrobe"


Set Costume Supervisor

It is rare that a costume designer works on location with the production crew during principal photography. More often, the costume designer designates a surrogate that will execute the design on set and provide leadership for the costume department.

Costume Shop Manager

The costume shop manager is a logistical supervisor who collaborates closely with the costume designer to oversee the fabrication and fit of all garments for theatrical productions, as well as film and television shows. This person does not participate in constructing costumes, but is responsible for overseeing the shop staff and ensuring that wardrobe is delivered on budget and in a timely manner.

Silvercup Studios

Silvercup Studios is independently owned and operated by brothers Alan and Stuart Suna, and takes its name from the former bakery on which the first shooting stage now sits.

 

Western Costume Company

Traveler and trader L.L. Burns founded Western Costume Co. after a run-in with a cowboy actor, William S. Hart. Burns observed the terribly inaccurate Indian costumes worn by actors in the early Western films, and when passing by Hart’s set, he made the filmmakers aware of his protest. Burns was hired on the spot to outfit the cast—he had accumulated a vast inventory of Native American goods—and the costume shop was born.

Wardrobe Supervisor

Upon opening night of a theatrical production, the costume designer’s work is done and the wardrobe supervisor assumes the role of wardrobe department head.

Special Effects Makeup Artist

While makeup is often used in film to make actors and actresses look more beautiful, it can also be used to make them look scary, beat-up, or inhuman. When a director needs a handsome actor to become a horrifying mutant zombie, he or she turns to the considerable talents of the special effects makeup artist.

Costume Dresser

A production with a small cast of a dozen or fewer is no great undertaking for the costume department, but when performers number several dozen or in the hundreds, a small army of costume dressers is employed to get bodies into garments and back onstage with impressive speed.

Assistant Costume Designer

The last stop on your way toward becoming a professional stage costume designer is to apprentice under a senior designer as an assistant. You are charged with keeping the logistics and creative chaos under control while the department churns out garments for a cast of two … or 200. 

Costume Designer

You can tell a lot about a character on the screen before a word of dialogue is uttered—if the costume designer has done a good job. Costumes reflect the character’s personality, culture, lifestyle, and environment; more than just dressing the actor, costumes aid the story and the performer’s immersion into the role. It is up to the costume designer to occupy the character’s psyche and reflect it in the actor’s wardrobe.